Are you a home brewer looking to take your craft to the next level? Look no further than “Beer Kegging: A How-To Guide.” In this informative video by TheBruSho, you’ll learn everything you need to know about kegging your homebrew, including the basics and components needed for kegging, different carbonation methods, and even the option to make or buy a kegerator. This video also highlights a partnership with NewAir for long-term kegging solutions, and offers a discount code for viewers to save 10% on the NewAir Single Tap Kegerator. So why wait? Start kegging your homebrew and enjoy the convenience, speed, and fun that comes with it.

Homebrewing doesn’t have to be complicated, thanks to kegging. In the video, Trent Mucho from The Bru Show shares his personal experience and knowledge on why kegging is worth the upgrade. He explains how bottling, although an inexpensive way to get started, can be time-consuming and prone to issues like exploding bottles. With kegging, you can say goodbye to those hassles and hello to the joy of pouring your own beer on tap. Trent breaks down the essential equipment needed for kegging and offers various options for purchasing or building your own kegerator. Plus, he provides tips for carbonation and achieving the perfect pour. Don’t miss out on the opportunity to simplify your home brewing process and elevate your beer enjoyment. Watch “Beer Kegging: A How-To Guide” today!

Beer Kegging A How To Guide

This image is property of i.ytimg.com.

Chapter 1: Introduction to Kegging

Advantages of kegging over bottling

Kegging your homebrew offers several advantages over traditional bottling. First and foremost, kegging is much quicker and easier than bottling. Instead of cleaning and sanitizing multiple bottles, you can simply fill one keg. This saves a significant amount of time and effort. Additionally, kegging allows for easier carbonation control. You can adjust the pressure and carbonation levels to your liking, resulting in a consistently carbonated and delicious brew. Finally, kegging offers the convenience of having your own home tap. There’s nothing quite like pulling a fresh pint of your own brew whenever you want.

Components needed for kegging

To start kegging your homebrew, you will need a few key components. The first component is the keg itself. The most popular choice for homebrewers is the Cornelius keg, also known as a corny keg. These kegs were originally used for sodas but have now found new life as beer kegs. You can often find used Cornelius kegs at a lower cost compared to buying new. Additionally, you will need a CO2 tank to provide carbonation. The pressure regulator is used to control the amount of carbonation in your keg. Finally, you will need a way to pour your beer, such as a tap or a picnic tap.

Different carbonation methods

When kegging your beer, there are several different methods you can use to carbonate it. One common method is to set the pressure with a regulator and allow the CO2 to absorb into the liquid over time. This method typically takes around 7 days to achieve full carbonation. However, if you’re looking to carbonate your beer faster, you can use burst carbonation. Burst carbonation involves setting the pressure to a higher amount for a shorter period of time, typically 24 hours. This method can carbonate your beer in as little as a day. Another quick carbonation method is the rock and shake technique. With this technique, you apply pressure to the keg and shake or rock it for a few minutes until it’s carbonated. While this method can be effective, it’s important to be cautious of overcarbonating or accelerating oxidation.

Chapter 2: Choosing a Keg

Introduction to the Cornelius keg

The Cornelius keg, also known as a corny keg, is the most popular choice for homebrewers when it comes to kegging their beer. These kegs were originally used for soda, but they have since become a popular choice for homebrewers due to their durability and ease of use. Cornelius kegs come in two types: ball lock and pin lock. These kegs can typically hold up to 5 gallons of beer, making them perfect for homebrewers. It’s important to be consistent with the type of keg you choose, as the fittings and connectors can vary between ball lock and pin lock kegs.

Affordable kegging options

While kegging can be more expensive than bottling, there are affordable options available for homebrewers. One way to save money when kegging is to buy used Cornelius kegs. You can often find these kegs at a lower cost on websites like Craigslist or through local homebrew stores. Another option is to explore DIY solutions for kegging. By repurposing items or building your own kegging setup, you can save money while still enjoying the benefits of kegging your homebrew.

Long-term kegging solutions with New Air

If you’re looking for a long-term kegging solution, New Air offers a partnership with homebrewers. They provide high-quality kegerators that are designed specifically for keg storage and serving. These kegerators come with all the necessary components for kegging, including a keg, CO2 tank, pressure regulator, and tap. By investing in a New Air kegerator, you can enjoy the convenience and efficiency of kegging your homebrew for years to come.

Chapter 3: Setting Up and Carbonating

Required equipment for kegging

To successfully keg your homebrew, there are a few essential pieces of equipment that you will need. These include a keg, CO2 tank, pressure regulator, gas and liquid tubing, and a tap. The keg is where your beer will be stored and carbonated. The CO2 tank provides the carbonation for your beer. The pressure regulator allows you to control the amount of carbonation in your keg. Gas and liquid tubing are used to connect the keg to the CO2 tank and tap. The tap is used to pour your beer.

Setting the pressure with a regulator

When kegging your beer, it’s important to set the pressure with a regulator to achieve the desired carbonation levels. The pressure regulator attaches to your CO2 tank and allows you to control the amount of carbonation going into your keg. Different styles of beer and personal preferences will dictate the appropriate carbonation levels. It’s helpful to consult online charts and calculators that take into account the desired carbonation and the temperature of your beer. By adjusting the pressure on your regulator, you can ensure that your beer is carbonated to your liking.

CO2 absorption into the liquid over time

Once you have set the pressure on your regulator, the CO2 will begin to absorb into the liquid in your keg over time. This absorption process typically takes around 7 days to achieve full carbonation. It’s important to be patient during this process and allow enough time for the CO2 to dissolve into the beer. Rushing the carbonation process can result in undercarbonated or overcarbonated beer. By allowing the CO2 to gradually absorb into the liquid, you can ensure a perfectly carbonated brew.

Fast carbonation methods

If you’re looking to carbonate your beer faster, there are a few methods you can try. One method is burst carbonation, where you set the pressure to a higher amount for a shorter period of time. For example, you can set the pressure to 40 psi for 24 hours and then release the high pressure and dial back the regulator to your desired carbonation level. This method can carbonate your beer in as little as a day. Another quick carbonation method is the rock and shake technique. With this technique, you apply pressure to the keg and shake or rock it for a few minutes until it’s carbonated. While these methods can be effective, it’s important to be cautious of overcarbonating or accelerating oxidation.

Chapter 4: Serving and Pouring

Impact of tube length and tap type on pour and foaminess

When it comes to serving your kegged beer, the length of tubing and type of tap you use can have an impact on the pour and foaminess of your beer. Longer tubing, typically around 10 feet, helps restrict the flow of beer, resulting in less foam and a smoother pour. This length of tubing is ideal when using a pressure of 10 psi. The type of tap you use can also affect the pour. Cobra taps or picnic taps are the cheapest options and are often used for portable setups. However, there are flow regulators available for taps that can help control the flow of beer and reduce foaminess.

Choosing the right serving setup

When it comes to choosing the right serving setup for your kegged beer, there are several factors to consider. If you’re looking for convenience and a professional appearance, a kegerator is a great option. Kegerators are mini-fridges that are specifically designed for keg storage and serving. They come with all the necessary components, including a keg, CO2 tank, pressure regulator, and tap. While kegerators require additional costs and setup, they offer a reliable and efficient way to serve your homebrew. Another option is to build your own kegerator using a used mini-fridge or repurposed item. This DIY approach allows for customization and can be more cost-effective.

Beer Kegging A How To Guide

This image is property of pixabay.com.

Chapter 5: Kegerator Options

Introduction to kegerators

Kegerators are specialized refrigerators that are designed to store and serve kegs of beer. These mini-fridges are the ultimate convenience when it comes to kegging your homebrew. Kegerators come equipped with all the necessary components for kegging, including a keg, CO2 tank, pressure regulator, and tap. They are specifically designed to maintain the perfect temperature and carbonation levels for your beer, ensuring a consistently delicious pour every time.

Additional costs and setup

While kegerators offer convenience and efficiency, it’s important to note that they come with additional costs and setup requirements. The first cost to consider is the price of the kegerator itself. You can find affordable options by scouring the internet for used kegerators or by building your own using a repurposed mini-fridge. Additionally, you will need to factor in the cost of a keg, CO2 tank, pressure regulator, and tap. These components can add up, so it’s important to budget accordingly. Setup-wise, you will need to ensure that your kegerator fits your chosen keg and that the temperature is properly regulated.

New Air Single Tap Kegerator

If you’re looking for a reliable and high-quality kegerator, the New Air Single Tap Kegerator is a great option. This kegerator is specifically designed for homebrewers and comes with all the necessary components for kegging. The New Air Single Tap Kegerator includes a keg, CO2 tank, pressure regulator, and tap. With this kegerator, you can enjoy the convenience of kegging your homebrew without the hassle of sourcing individual components. Additionally, viewers of the video featuring the New Air Single Tap Kegerator can use a discount code to save 10% on their purchase.

Chapter 6: Cleaning and Sanitizing

Importance of cleaning and sanitizing the keg

One of the most important steps in the kegging process is cleaning and sanitizing the keg. Proper cleaning and sanitizing are essential for maintaining the quality and flavor of your homebrew. Cleaning the keg removes any residue or debris that may be present, ensuring a clean surface for your beer. Sanitizing the keg eliminates any potential bacteria or contaminants that could affect the taste or spoil your brew. Without proper cleaning and sanitizing, your beer may be at risk of off-flavors or spoilage.

Best practices for cleaning and sanitizing

To clean and sanitize your keg, there are several best practices to follow. The first step is to disassemble the keg and soak all the individual components in a cleaning solution. This solution should be specifically designed for homebrewing and can be found at your local homebrew store. After soaking, use a cleaning brush to scrub away any residue or debris. Rinse everything thoroughly with clean water to ensure all cleaning solution is removed. Once cleaned, the keg and components should be sanitized using a sanitizing solution. Follow the instructions on the sanitizing solution to ensure proper sanitization. Be sure to rinse the keg and components with clean water once again before using them for kegging your homebrew.

Beer Kegging A How To Guide

This image is property of pixabay.com.

Chapter 7: Time-Saving Benefits

Time saved with kegging vs. bottling

One of the biggest advantages of kegging your homebrew is the amount of time it saves compared to bottling. Bottling can be a time-consuming process, requiring you to clean and sanitize multiple bottles, fill them individually, and cap them. This process can take several hours, depending on the size of your batch. In contrast, kegging only requires filling one keg, saving you significant time and effort. With kegging, you can have your beer carbonated and ready to enjoy in a fraction of the time it takes to bottle.

Enjoying fully carbonated beer sooner

Another time-saving benefit of kegging is the ability to enjoy fully carbonated beer sooner. When bottling, carbonation can take several weeks, if not longer, to fully develop. This waiting period can be frustrating for homebrewers who are eager to try their beer. With kegging, the carbonation process is much quicker. By setting the pressure and allowing the CO2 to absorb into the liquid over time, you can achieve full carbonation in as little as 7 days. This means you can enjoy your fully carbonated beer much sooner, allowing you to savor the fruits of your labor without extensive waiting times.

Motivation to brew more beer

Kegging your homebrew can also serve as a motivating factor to brew more beer. The convenience and ease of kegging make it a more enjoyable and efficient process compared to bottling. This can inspire homebrewers to experiment with different recipes, try new flavors, and brew more frequently. With kegging, you have the ability to easily store and serve multiple batches of beer, making it easier to keep up with demand and share your delicious creations with friends and family. Kegging not only saves time but also adds a level of excitement and motivation to the homebrewing process.

Chapter 8: Conclusion

Encouragement to start kegging homebrew

If you’re a homebrewer looking to simplify your brewing process and enhance your enjoyment, kegging your beer is a fantastic option. The advantages of kegging over bottling, such as time-saving, convenience, and carbonation control, make it a worthwhile investment. By kegging your homebrew, you can eliminate the labor-intensive process of bottling and enjoy perfectly carbonated beer at your convenience. Don’t be intimidated by the equipment and setup involved ā€“ kegging is easier than you may think, and anyone can do it with a little bit of knowledge and practice.

Final thoughts on the benefits of kegging

In conclusion, kegging your homebrew offers a multitude of benefits. From saving time and effort to enjoying fully carbonated beer sooner, kegging is a game-changer for homebrewers. The flexibility and convenience of kegging give you the ability to control your carbonation levels, experiment with new recipes, and brew more frequently. Whether you choose to build your own kegging setup or invest in a kegerator, the satisfaction of kegging your own beer and pouring it from your home tap is unmatched. So don’t delay ā€“ start kegging your homebrew today and unlock a whole new world of convenience and enjoyment. Cheers!

Beer Kegging A How To Guide

This image is property of pixabay.com.

Hi, Iā€™m Carlie Brandywine

Hi, I'm Carlie Brandywine, the author behind Total Beverage. As a passionate lover of coffee, beer, cocktails, spirits, tea, and all things beverage-related, I've created this website to share my expertise and recommendations with fellow enthusiasts. At Total Beverage, you'll find a curated selection of products and gift ideas tailored to the needs and tastes of beverage lovers. Whether you're in search of coffee equipment, wine-related products, bar accessories, or home bar equipment, I've got you covered. Join me on this journey as we explore the world of beverages and find everything you need to prepare, serve, and savor your favorite drinks. Cheers!